Thursday, January 6, 2011

Lemon Curd



Lemon Curd is the quintessential English tea condiment for scones, crumpets and whatever other type of breads that are served. It takes a simple time of tea and scones to another level. The is the classic flavor of curd, although I have seen curd recipes that are very tempting made with other types of fruits. The same recipe could be used but substitute the juice of other fruits, like berries or other citrus fruits. Lemon curd is also wonderful when used as a filling for a dessert tart made of shortbread or small individual tarts, or on top of thumbprint cookies/shortbread cookies. I have seen some people recommend bottled lemon juice because the acidity is standardized. However, I believe the fresh juice and rind makes a better product. I personally don't want to use bottled lemon juice and still need to grate a lemon for the rind- I would rather use the entire fruit.

There are also so many methods to making the curd, but it really will work any number of ways. I think this is one of the easier ways to make it and still have great results. If you have a problem and some of the eggs curdle or clump, just pour it all through a fine mesh sieve at the end.

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 medium- large lemons- about 1/2 cup of juice (microwaving the lemon for about 10 seconds makes it easier to juice)
  • rind of the lemons, grated
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 stick of butter
  • 1 1/3 cup sugar

Directions:

  • Wash lemons and grate the rind firmly but careful not to get any of the white pith. 
  • Place the lemon juice, grated rind, butter and sugar in a glass bowl set over a saucepan of hot water (or just use a non-reactive saucepan). Stir until butter has melted and sugar dissolves. 
  • Remove from heat and cool slightly.
  • Beat the eggs in a separate bowl and add slowly to the lemon mixture, stirring all the time with a wooden spoon or non-metal implement.  
  • Return the bowl/pan to the medium heat and cook (do not allow it to boil), stirring occasionally, until the curd thickens and coats the back of the spoon. 
  • Pour into cleaned warm 1/2 pint jars and cover.
Makes about 1 1/2 - 2 cups.

 This can be kept in the fridge for about 2-3 weeks or it can be canned in half pint jars via a hot water bath for 15 minutes. If it is stored for more than 3 month, there is a chance it will darken in color, but the flavor will still be great.




2 comments:

  1. Thank you Sara for showing your interest in Indian food and my website.Your praises really inspirating.I shall not let any one down in my pursuit to bring forward more recipes interesting and useful to public art large.Thankyou once again.

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